The week that was (04-27-2018)

MedMen, a high-end marijuana dispensary, opened its doors on Fifth Avenue.

“It was selfish. It started small and got bigger and out of control,” said Gilberto Escamilla, a South Texas man pleading guilty to stealing $1.2M in fajitas.

Because of quadruple-digit inflation in Venezuela, computers at the country’s stock exchange are no longer able to efficiently calculate share prices.

Students at the UC Berkeley elected a squirrel to its student senate.

Avery Island, the home of Tabasco, is in danger due to rising sea levels.

Kim Jong Un  brought his own toilet to the historic Korea summit.

Scientists can now successfully keep a pig’s brain alive, without the body.

Donald Trump’s scheduled visit to the UK in July will fall on Friday the 13th when there will also be a partial eclipse of the sun.

After an argument with his mother, a 12-year old boy grabbed his mom’s credit card and took a 4-day holiday in Bali.

California has several initiatives to break off from the United States. In Memphis, leaders are discussing leaving the State of Tennessee.

It was reported that only three wild caribou are left in the contiguous United States.

Scientists grew vegetables in Antarctica without soil or sunlight to determine if it might be possible to grow crops on a potential mission to Mars.

A mail carrier in Brooklyn stashed about 17,000 pieces of undelivered mail for more than a decade because he was “overwhelmed”

A road that recharges electric vehicles as they drive on it opened in Sweden.

An engineer in Japan who grew up watching The Transformers, built one.

Photo credit “What the Verdun battlefield looks like now”  jeroentje22

Sign up to receive The week that was by email!

The week that was (04-20-2018)

The CEO of MGA Entertainment bid $890 million in a last-minute effort to save Toys R Us from going bankrupt. Five people were arrested after they turned an abandoned Toys R Us into a massive rave.

The Walmart yodeling boy sang at Coachella.

In a leaked memo, Apple warns employees to stop leaking information

Samsung stock plummeted 10% after an employee of Samsung Securities pressed the wrong key and mistakenly unleashed 2 billion shares (worth about $105 billion USD) to members of its stock option program instead of 2 billion won (about $2 billion USD). The mistake was compounded during the 37 minutes it took to realize and correct the error when several eagle-eyed employees sold their windfall, flooding the market and depressing share prices.

The IRS’ “modernized eFile tax system,” built to handle bulk tax form submissions from online services such as Turbo Tax and H&R Block’s Tax Cut, crashed on the last day to file taxes.

In preparation for the eventual colonization of space, NASA shot human sperm into space.

Bitcoin prices spiked with some attributing the renewed interest to the cryptocurrency satisfying conditions that would make it halal.

Scientists accidentally created a mutant enzyme that breaks down plastic drink bottles.

Four recent MIT graduates unveiled their new “Spyce Kitchen,” a robotic cooking machine about the size of a refrigerator which, at the press of a button, can turn out in less than three minutes any of the seven chef-approved bowls of stew on its menu. The first prototype, built in the basement of their fraternity house, “was conceived as an engineering solution to every hungry college student’s gripe — where to get good, cheap food fast.”

If you think your coffee has a bit too much of a jolt in it, beware. It might contain used battery dust.

A trader named Morgan Stanley was fired from Morgan Stanley.

Police in Louisiana say a woman came home to discover a naked stranger in her tub, eating her Cheetos while taking a bath.

In what is being hailed as a “Moon-landing equivalent for robots,” two engineers in Singapore have built an AI-powered robot that can build an IKEA chair in less than 21-minutes without instructions.

The FDA approved contact lenses that darken in sunlight.

Remember that burned out home in San Jose listed for $800,000? A condemed home in Fremont, just a few miles away, sold for $1.2 million, all cash.

A small town in Georgia prepared for a large Neo-Nazi march scheduled in their town by inviting families to draw rainbows and unicorns along the parade route.

Five men that attended San Rafael High School in 1971 came forward with the origin story of 420 code with published evidence.

Sign up to receive The week that was by email!

The week that was (04-13-2018)

Queen Elizabeth compared President Trump to a noisy helicopter.

An Ohio man was arrested Wednesday on a domestic violence charge, after hitting a woman in the face with a pizza.

A Houston gas station owner opened fire on someone who underpaid for his Slim Jim.

A 12-year-old in Philadelphia was arrested for brandishing a loaded assault rifle.

A Spaniard, raised by wolves, confessed to being disappointed with human life.

Someone finally invented a “roomba for your lawn.” (Lars in Tokyo points out Honda already has one).

Sales are way up at the New England Confectionery Company after they announced they were going to stop making their iconic Necco wafer. “People are rushing to stockpile them like they’re the next cryptocurrency.”

After 120 years, Sears is closing its last store in Chicago, its hometown.

DARPA developed a neural implant that has been shown to improve short-term memory by an average of 35 percent.

Chinese search engine giant Baidu launched a stock photo platform that uses blockchain technology to protect image intellectual property.

A married couple in China that was tragically killed in a car crash four years ago gave “birth” to a baby through a surrogate mother using IVF. The grandparents are overjoyed but had to submit to DNA testing to prove the baby’s nationality.

Researchers from Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute determined that the human body continues to produce new brain cells well into your 70’s.

Hockey sticks were left out on front doorsteps all across Canada as the nation mourned the loss of 15 college hockey players in a tragic bus crash.

In Denmark, the demolition of an old 173-foot concrete silo went horribly wrong and took out the neighboring library and cultural center.

A burned out house in San Jose was listed for $800,000.

“It’s a windy day. It must have flown through the window and into my purse,” claimed Kennecia Posey who was pulled over for erratic driving and arrested for possession of cocaine and marijuana.

Eight Argentinian police officers were fired after claiming that more than half a ton of marijuana that disappeared from a police warehouse had been eaten by mice.

“The time has come for serious consideration of a shift in federal marijuana policy,” said former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John Boehner in a statement announcing his addition to the board of one of the nation’s largest, multi-state actively-managed cannabis corporations.

In an effort to combat climate change, Los Angeles began painting some of its streets white to reflect the summer heat. Not to be outdone, China is testing roads paved with solar panels.

A 112-year-old Japanese man was recognized by Guinness Book of World Records as the world’s oldest male. The world’s oldest female is a 117-year-old Jamaican.

Starting next year, it will cost an extra 1,000 yen to leave Japan.

A large chunk of the Irish cliffs of Mór fell into the Atlantic.

photo credit: Trump walked to Air Force One in high winds — and the photos of his hair are mesmerizing

Sign up to receive The week that was by email!

Zuck goes to Washington

Sure you could watch 9 hours of testimony (Day 1 on CSPAN, Day 2 on CSPAN) but just to put it in one place, here are the takes that I found insightful. I’ll add to this post when I find things so please add something in the comments too.

The New York Times’ Podcast The Daily had a great wrap-up of each day and are worth listening to in order.

Congress vs. Mark Zuckerberg covers the Senate hearings on Day One
Questioning the Business of Facebook covers the House on Day Two.

For a historical context, here’s a 2003 post in The Harvard Crimson about another site that was more popular than anticipated and drew criticism.

Anil Dash, central to the creation of early blogger communities, speaks the wiseman in a short video addressed to Facebook employees. “We can’t have it both ways. We can’t say we’re able to change the world and pretend it’s not our fault when we do.”

There were many photos, here are some of my favorites.

Leah Mills/Reuters

One photographer got a photo of Mark’s notes which was picked apart and dissected for insights.

Then there were the memes

Zuck in his booster seat

Zuck’s testimony in DC even reverberated all the way over to the TED conference that was being held in Vancouver. Here’s early internet pioneer talking about the Internet’s Original Sin.

The week that was (04-06-2018)

While a Milwaukee pastor was delivering his Easter sermon to his congregation a thief broke into his SUV and stole his bible.

An Easter performance of the Passion of Christ was all too real for a member of the audience member in Brazil. Taking matters into his own hands he whacked the actor playing a Roman soldier with his motorcycle helmet to rescue Jesus from the cross.

For the first time in modern history, the murder rate in London surpassed that of New York.

A South Carolina congressman pulled out a loaded .38-caliber Smith & Wesson handgun during a meeting with his constituents on Friday.

The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation was called out to rescue two goats stuck on a bridge.

photo credit: U2 pilot selfie with Northern Lights

Sign up to receive The week that was by email!