Categories
Home

San Francisco for the weekend

With the family away it seemed like a good time to get away for a quick trip out to the left coast for the long weekend. Beautiful weather, fun times, and random photos from the weekend.

Categories
Current Events

Oops!

nypost.jpg

The New York Post jumped the gun on their morning edition and picked the wrong horse for the Democratic Vice Presidential nomination on their cover story. The offending file was quickly removed from their web site but not soon enough for Reuters to pick it up and get a comment from the Post’s rival across town, the Daily News.

Media sources said the News sent a case of champagne to Post editors and a note, “Congratulations on your front page. Have a nice day,” with a smiley face. The barb refers to a Post advertisement near the Daily News building showing improved circulation figures, with the words “have a nice day” and smiley face

Meanwhile, my sources in the Blogsphere scooped the popular media with this mention on a US Airways forum:

John Kerry”s 757 was in hgr 4 pit tonight John Edwards vp decals were being put on engine cowlings and upper fuselage. :up:

I think there was a story on how the AOL Time Warner merger almost broke early because someone in the copy shop that printed up the signs for the press announcement almost leaked the story to the press. It was squelched but only just in time.

How rumor becomes reality – some operations are better at fact-checking than others.

Categories
Office

The Independent on Search

Charles Arthur, who writes for the UK paper, The Independent puts the Search conundrum in plain English,

Yet it’s strange that it’s a lot easier to find something on the web than on my desk; and easier to find something on the web than on my computer. You would think one would store the things that are most important in the closest, most accessible locations; after all, you don’t leave your wallet and car keys at the bottom of an unlit stairwell locked in a safe while keeping your entire wardrobe within arm’s length.

Instead, Google, halfway around the world, is the default for a lot of the horsework, looking up phone numbers, checking facts, finding references…. But why do we let computers make our lives hard for us? Partly because we”ve let them remain stupid. The graphical user interface, with its metaphors of “files and folder and desktop”, has remained unchanged since 1983 when Apple introduced it with the Lisa. . .

I believe it was Bill Gates who once admonished his developers that it was ridiculous that it took longer to find a file on a local hard disk through Windows than it did to find a document among billions on the open web via Google. This became the rallying cause behind including a SQL based file system for Longhorn.

You think your job is tough?

quitcomplainingaboutyourjob.JPG

One in a series of pictures titled, “Quit Complaining About Your Job” that landed in my email box the other day. Not only are you a human sign post, you’re one that gets shot at too! (thanks to Perry Burns)

Categories
Office

Email is broken

Peter Coffee writes in Goodbye to Email that spam, phishing, and the hide-and-seek games that spammers play in trying to outwit new email filter schemes is causing so much headache that some Enterprise IT manager’s are looking at alternative communication channels such as application-to-application links.

. . . the fraction of e-mail comprising spam rose from 58 percent in December 2003 to 64 percent in May, according to measurements by anti-spam provider Brightmail. That’s an annual growth rate of 83 percent in spam per desired message, but total distraction grows even more quickly as people use e-mail more often: Nucleus Research estimates the average worker receives 29 unwanted messages each day, more than twice the figure of 13 that the company found a year ago. . .

The blank slate of e-mail has given enterprises the freedom to visualize and experiment with future communication tools. Now that those rough sketches have taken form, it’s time to produce more rigorous blueprints, using more focused and less readily abused technologies such as Web services. E-mail will still have a role but not as the central nervous system of the 21st-century workplace.

The breakdown of email as the "killer app" is driving next phase in the evolution towards business-to-business integration that is driving developers to pick up where they left off in building some of the "connectors" promised with systems such as Microsoft’s BizTalk Server but updating their work with more standards-based, web services interfaces. Such an evolution will only serve to hasten the availability and use of the web as platform.

Categories
Office

High-Tech Tour

The 101st Tour de France started on July 3rd and Lance Armstrong will be going for an unprecedented sixth consecutive win. It’ll be a sprinter’s race for the next two weeks (yesterday’s finish of Stage 2 ended was clocked at speeds of 67 kms!) leading up the mountains where the men are separated from the boys. In the meantime, here’s a post on the latest gadgets at use in the peleton.

I’ve already signed up for SMS pages of the daily results.

Categories
Office

Search, not Sort

Wired files this story on Apple’s announcement of Spotlight.

In Jobs’ scheme, the hierarchy of files and folders is a dreary, outdated metaphor inspired by office filing. In today’s communications era, categorized by the daily barrage of new e-mails, websites, pictures and movies, who wants to file when you can simply search? What does it matter where a file is stored, as long as you can find it?

Microsoft is already doing this with something called “Search Folders” on Outlook 2003, Apple is extending that paradigm to the entire hard drive and indexing in the background to improve performance.

Categories
Office

Spotlight Developer’s Kit

Just dug around a bit and see that Apple will be providing a Developer’s Kit to extend Spotlight’s search engine to other applications.

But the search engine also works contextually within applications such as Apple’s Mail, Address Book and System Preferences—and Apple is giving developers at WWDC a software development kit to help them build Spotlight into their own applications.
eWeek, June 28th

I guess they’re going to reach out to their developer’s community to connect Spotlight to the internet. This should be interesting.

Categories
Current Events

SUV No Swimee

campanella.jpg

Meanwhile in Hawai’i – Pat Campanella gave his wife Mimi driving lessons and she overcompensated to avoid an oncoming car sending their Toyota Highlander through a neighbor’s fence, across the patio and into the 80-year old’s pool. The couple got out fine, a little shaken and wet but otherwise uninjured.

I can imagine the husband shouting as they flew across the yard, “The brake! The brake! No the the left pedal, LEFT!”

Categories
Office

Wall Street Journal picks up scent

Front Page of yesterday’s Marketplace section has two stories, side-by-side, picking up on the meme of universal search with a graphic of two bloodhounds trying to get their way into a PC. One covers the announcement of the beta MSN search interface announced yesterday and the second looks at Apple’s Spotlight utility for desktop search. Both articles pose the theory that each of these companies are edging into the search space as a key differentiators. Microsoft’s approach is to create a better portal to the internet and Apple is working on getting an integrated desktop search out the door ahead of Microsoft’s Longhorn launch which promises better desktop searching.

If Microsoft is launching a better internet search engine to couple to their improved desktop search tools launching with Longhorn, and Apple is bundling better desktop search with Spotlight, the only thing missing is Apple integrated with an internet search engine. Apple’s Safari browser already integrates Google without the need of a separate toolbar – wonder what will happen to Sherlock which was Apple’s first attempt to embed internet searching into the desktop? Will Apple build its own, partner with a partner like Google, or reach out to the developer community to add on to Spotlight internet search integration?

Not exactly an admission, the article about Spotlight digs in to ask if either Google or Yahoo are looking at getting into the desktop search business themselves,

Google, which has become synonymous with finding information on the Internet, is working on its own tool for searching a PC, according to people who have talked with the company. A Google spokesman declined to comment on any product plans. Analysts say Yahoo may also get into desktop search. “If we think that’s something we need to do, we’ll look at it,” a Yahoo spokeswoman says.