Month: August 2005

  • MSN to compete with Gawker & Weblogs Inc.

    Now we know why Microsoft was seen on the job boards looking to hire bloggers. MSN’s new service, Filter, aims to take the best of the blog posts and highlight them for their readers. Slate (now owned by the Washington Post Company) was Microsoft’s last big effort at content creation and for that effort they […]

  • comScore Measures the Blogosphere

    Over the weekend comScore Networks released a market research report (pdf) on the growth and scale of the blogosphere. The report was unique in its methodology. Rather than extrapolate from a self-selecting sample of users that may or may not realize they are visiting a blog, comScore’s survey and measured actual behaviors of its permission-based […]

  • Photos from Japan

    Ok, I’m getting there. I’ve uploaded some photos from the Japan trip to give you a sense of what we did while we were there. A guy I work with, Matt Peterson also took some pictures while he was in Japan and they are fantastic.

  • Business Blogs gets local coverage

    While I was on vacation last week, the Oakland Tribune ran a story about corporations getting into blogging for which I was interviewed. While the angle they took was a tad alarmist, (Watch Out! The first step into the blogging world can  be a doozy) but it’s nice to see business blogs getting some coverage […]

  • 15 minutes of fame

    While I was in Japan last week, the Oakland Tribune ran a story about corporations getting into blogging. The angle they took was not quite the one I would have stressed (the first step into the blogging world can sometimes be a doozy) but it’s nice to see business blogs getting some coverage in the […]

  • “Blogging” as a hook

    Airbag notes that Gateway is now using “blogging” as reason to buy a new computer. Amazing how in less than five years blogging has replaced gaming, video editing, and homework as the criteria of choice for purchasing a computer. Put another tick on the checklist of what it takes to go mainstream. What’s next?

  • Back in the Day

    Back in the Day

    San Francisco before the .com boom and my brush with Louis Rossetto and other name drops. I read Gary Wolf’s Wired, an account of the magazine and it’s founder, Louis Rossetto. The tales within resonate even stronger than most books about this era because I have a personal connection with some of the characters within. […]