YouTube as a Search Engine

My son was featured in yesterday’s Sunday New York Times in an article (At First, Funny videos. Now, a Reference Tool) about the unforeseen use of YouTube as a research tool. We all associate videos with entertainment but Tyler has taught me that with the addition of meta-data and micro-chunked content, it’s possible to use YouTube as a rich source of reference material.

Tyler's New York Times article

I was contacted by the reporter, who had seen a post on ReadWriteWeb about Tyler’s use of YouTube and wanted to bring the story to the New York Times’ readers.

My father commented, “It is the inclination of succeeding generations to simplify.” Tyler is on to something. For certain things (contact juggling, macarena, or bugatti vs. fighter jet), YouTube is going to explain things to you better and quicker than plain old text search results. You can sort by not only Relevance and Date Added but also using meta-data from community actions such as Ratings and View Count. Finally, using the example from the article, if you search on platypus, embedded in the results is a pre-defined playlist of over 40 video clips all about the animal.

Tyler was pleased to see that the article was in the “Bright Ideas” section. His comment about his pose in the photo was that after over 200 photos his head was feeling a little heavy. Strangely, the local newsstand didn’t carry the Sunday Times so we had to go to a Starbucks to get a copy for the photo above and as a keepsake.

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2 thoughts on “YouTube as a Search Engine”

  1. Very cool. I wonder how many of the posts on YouTube about the Wii are made by kids themselves…Something about kids helping each other out here is really neat. Classic though, that it was Tyler, no way your kids will be Luddites…

  2. Congrats Tyler! That is just too cool. However, I did buy a DVD a few weeks ago to learn Contact Juggling. (Which is awesome!) Much better than just seeing the people do their thing on YouTube — at least for a beginner.

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